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CINCH - Health Economics Research Center

Virtual Essen Health Economics Seminar

20.04.2021

On Monday, April 26 2021, 16:00 - 17:30, Marion Aouad (UC Irvine) will present:

An Examination of the Intracorrelation of Family Health Insurance

The onset of an individual-level health shock may result in non-trivial health insurance consequences for the family. This is because of the structure of US health care markets, where health insurance is often bundled at the family level and provided through an employer. Yet, relatively little is known about how the structure of bundled health insurance may amplify the effects of an individual-level health shock. Filling this gap, this study uses a large US medical claims dataset to examine how an isolated appendicitis emergency affects families’ health insurance outcomes.  Using coarsened exact matching and stacked difference-in-differences, this study finds that an acute appendicitis emergency leads to a 7-14 percent decreased likelihood of leaving the current health insurance network and health plan. This is primarily driven by reduced rates of job switching by the plan’s primary beneficiary. Furthermore, switching frictions stemming from the non-portability of health insurance products may contribute to the observed "health plan lock."

Room: Due to the current situation regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, the talk will be held in a virtual seminar room. For more information click here.


Virtual Essen Health Economics Seminar

13.04.2021

On Monday, April 19 2021, 16:00 - 17:30, Leila Agha (Dartmouth College) will present:

Fixing Misallocation with Guidelines: Awareness vs. Adherence

Expert decisions often deviate from evidence-based guidelines. If experts are unaware of guidelines, dissemination may improve outcomes. If experts are aware of guidelines but continue to deviate, promoting stricter adherence has ambiguous effects on outcomes, depending on whether experts have information not in guidelines. We study guidelines for anticoagulant use to prevent strokes among atrial fibrillation patients. By text-mining physician notes for guideline mentions, we identify when physicians start using a guideline. After mentioning the guideline, physicians' prescription decisions become more guideline concordant, but adherence remains far from perfect. To evaluate whether non-adherence reflects physicians' superior information, we combine observational data on treatment choices with machine learning estimates of heterogeneous treatment effects from eight randomized trials. When physicians depart from guidelines, they are not responding to measurable treatment effect heterogeneity. Promoting stricter adherence to guidelines could prevent 33% more strokes, producing much larger gains than broader guideline awareness.

Room: Due to the current situation regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, the talk will be held in a virtual seminar room. For more information click here.


Virtual Essen Health Economics Seminar

06.04.2021

On Monday, April 12 2021, 16:00 - 17:30, Esmée Zwiers (Princeton) will present:

Pill vs Gatekeeper Power: Birth Control Access, Religious Beliefs, and Women’s Outcomes

We study how access to birth control affects short- and long-term outcomes of women in a new context: the 1970 liberalization of the contraceptive pill in the Netherlands. We first document a massive immediate drop in the birth rate post-liberalization that was particularly strong for young women, the group for which access restrictions were most drastically lifted. We then exploit area level social norms – proxied by votes for religious parties who were against relaxing access rules – to obtain causal estimates of the impact of the availability of the pill on female fertility control and especially changes in the prevalence of ill-timed births. We find that women who lived in areas that were less religiously resistant to the introduction of the pill were much less likely to experience an underage birth or marriage. These women went on to invest more in education and ended up in wealthier households. We then measure the importance of birth control providers’ beliefs in providing access to the available technology by estimating the additional effect of the religiosity of local health professionals on women’s outcomes. We that find a larger proportion of religious ‘gatekeepers’ around a woman at the time of liberalization all but wiped out any positive pill impact.

Room: Due to the current situation regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, the talk will be held in a virtual seminar room. For more information click here.