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CINCH working paper 2015/12

01.12.2015

A new working paper has been added to the CINCH working paper series: "Heterogeneity in Marginal Nonmonetary Returns to Higher Education” by Daniel A. Kamhöfer, Hendrik Schmitz and Matthias Westphal.

In this paper we estimate the effects of college education on cognitive abilities and health exploiting exogenous variation in college availability and student loan regulations. By means of semiparametric local instrumental variables techniques we estimate marginal treatment effects in an environment of essential heterogeneity. The results suggest heterogeneous but always positive effects on cognitive skills and homogeneously positive effects for all health outcomes but mental health, where the effects are around zero throughout. We find that likely mechanisms of positive physical health returns are effects of college education on physically demanding activities on the job and health behavior such as smoking and drinking while mentally more demanding jobs might explain the skill returns.

Download Working Paper #2015/12:
Heterogeneity in Marginal Nonmonetary Returns to Higher Education


CINCH Working Paper 2015/11

01.11.2015

A new working paper has been added to the CINCH working paper series: "Parental education and child health: Evidence from an education reform in China” by Samantha B. Rawlings.

This paper investigates the impact of parental education on child health, exploiting a compulsory schooling law implemented in China in 1986 that extended schooling from 6 to 9 years. It finds that it is maternal, rather than paternal, education that matters most for child health. There are also important differences in the effect according to child gender. An additional year of mother’s education raises boys height-for-age by 0.163 standard deviations, whilst there is no statistically significant effect on girls height. Parental education appears to have little effect on weight-for-age of children. Estimated effects on height are driven by the rural sample, where an additional year of mother’s education raises boys height for age by 0.228 standard deviations and lowers the probability of a boy being classified as stunted by 6.6 percentage points. Results therefore suggest that - at least in rural areas - son preference in China has additional impacts beyond the sex-ratio at birth.

Download Working Paper #2015/11
Parental education and child health